OmniAir’s International Membership Continues to Grow as Portugal-based Veniam Joins OmniAir

OmniAir is proud to announce our newest member Veniam, which has developed a platform to move terabytes of data between vehicles and the cloud.

Veniam’s core business is focused on creating mesh networks of connected vehicles capable of transmitting and receiving massive amounts of data, utilizing a multi-network approach (4G LTE, DSRC, Wi-Fi, and V2X Multi-Hop), smart local data management and low-latency applications.

Over the last four years, Veniam deployed and is operating mesh networks of connected vehicles in Porto, Singapore, and New York.

Their work has expanded coverage and created a more dependable wireless network that gathers data for a myriad of smart city applications.

“The ability to seamlessly connect and transmit data between vehicles, infrastructure, and pedestrians is the key component to ensure public and government support of fully autonomous vehicles on our roads, said Jason Conley,  Executive Director for OmniAir Consortium. “We are excited to partner with firms like Veniam whose approach supports enhanced public safety benefits and smart city initiatives while balancing the needs of the free market to monetize the technology by running their systems over a more robust and reliable network.”

Autonomous vehicles are coming much faster than anyone imagined. BMW announced it will debut a fully autonomous car in 2021, while Tesla says they will do the same by the end of 2017. These vehicles will be incredibly data hungry, consuming up to 4,000 GBs per day. One thing is clear: the current mobile internet infrastructure is not ready for this new and impending data tsunami.

Veniam combines the deployment of very low-latency and high-speed connectivity and smart city services in a new “Internet of moving things” concept. Through this service, connected urban vehicle fleets become agents of a meshed connected network deployed in real time across cities, extending Internet access and enabling the collection and real-time analysis of environmental data from connected sensors. Orange Digital Ventures, alongside Verizon Ventures and Cisco, participated in a 25 million-dollar fund raising round, thanks to which Veniam will be able to expand its vision worldwide, after leading the implementation of the first mesh networks of connected vehicles in Porto, Singapore and New York.

OmniAir Consortium is the leading industry association promoting interoperability and certification in ITS, tolling, IoT technologies and connected vehicles. OmniAir’s membership includes public agencies, private companies, research institutions, and independent test labs. Learn more about OmniAir at www.omniair.org.

Connected and Automated Vehicles Take Center Stage in Washington

On June 27, Congress held yet another hearing examining the federal government’s role in regulating automated vehicles. The U.S. House of Representatives Energy & Commerce Subcommittee hearing examined potential hurdles to widespread deployment of Highly Automated Vehicles (HAV), with attention focused on addressing the current patchwork of state laws governing automated vehicles.

Committee members on both sides of the aisle acknowledged potential safety benefits of automated vehicles. Democrats, however, cautioned about the need move cautiously in preempting state legislation. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 22 states already have legislation or Executive Orders on the books related to the operation of automated vehicles.

Witnesses from the Global Automakers and Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers emphasized the need to clarify the role of federal vs. state policy and to expand Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) exemptions, under the Safety Act.

House Republicans introduced a package of 14 bills intended to guide the deployment automated vehicles. The legislative package attempts to clarify appropriate federal and state roles in regulating automated vehicles while easing federal regulatory burdens. A section-by-section summary of each bill is available in the House Republican’s hearing briefing memo, starting on p. 7.

The following day, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) jointly hosted a workshop on Connected Cars, which examined key policy issues raised by V2X technologies, including data ownership, cybersecurity, and privacy.

FTC Acting Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen opened by remarking that, just like automobiles did 125 years ago, “that connected car technology could revolutionize the world again.” The Chair outlined the FTC’s expected role, including consumer education on privacy and data security issues, as well as the use of the Commission’s civil enforcement authority, where necessary, under section 5 of the FTC Act against manufacturers of connected devices, including cars.

Panels of experts delved into a series of thorny policy issues, such as data ownership rights. Still unresolved are issues of data ownership and use, addressing cybersecurity vulnerabilities, and examining privacy issues. Panelists discussed ongoing government and industry efforts to address these issues, including through the Auto-ISAC as well as the USDOT’s Connected Vehicle programs.

Several panelists, including Booz Allen Hamilton’s Dr. Christopher Hill, remarked on the fact that DSRC-based V2X systems benefit from a mature and well-established privacy and security features, including privacy-by-design and a robust PKI system.

 

V2X Brings Additional Safety to Self-Driving Cars

Connectivity is the Key to Safety for Automated Vehicles

For those in our industry who have been laboring for years to develop and refine DSRC-based Connected Vehicle technologies, the recent enthusiasm for Automated Vehicles has proved vexing. Hardly a day goes by when we read another article or listen to testimony in Congress about the “life-saving benefits” of Automated Vehicles, with little mention of the well-documented and thoroughly demonstrated safety benefits of connectivity.

In last week’s hearing on automated vehicles, no less than the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Senator Thune (R-SD), remarked that “self-driving vehicle technology will have a transformational impact on highway safety.” Senator Peters (R-MI), added: “Self-driving vehicles will not only dramatically change how we get from place to place, they have the potential to prevent accidents and save thousands of lives.”

No doubt, self-driving vehicles hold great promise. We are all familiar with the oft-quoted statistic, that over 94% of all crashes are attributable to human error. Proponents of V2V have often argued the same.

It would seem, then, only logical that fully-automated automobiles, which remove all human control, would be the safest of all. But what if advocates for automated vehicles, the tech press, and innumerable marketing departments have over-stated the case? What if all of the technologies in a self-contained automobile are simply not enough to ensure the safety of passengers and pedestrians?

Yesterday, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) published a report on the deadly crash in 2016 involving a Tesla Model S and the driver’s use of semi-automated vehicle control systems. The 500+ page report raises questions about how drivers will be able to safely interact with varying levels of vehicle automation.

Particularly disappointing was an article published last week by the libertarian think tank, the Niskanen Center, which takes dead aim at DSRC, noting its opposition to NHTSA’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) Communications.

While there may be reasonable differences of opinion on NHTSA’s proposed rule, which OmniAir strongly supports, the author of that article seems to make the argument that DSRC is somehow unnecessary for successful deployment of Automated Vehicles.  I could not disagree more.

DSRC-based V2X technologies provide an important additional safety layer, transmitting basic safety messages from vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure. DSRC can broadcast signals up to 300 meters, providing an essential “third eye” to self-driving cars. The fact that these signals broadcast through walls and around corners augment the line of sight capabilities of cameras, LiDAR, radar, and other technologies used by autonomous vehicles.

Most importantly, DSRC-based V2X is ready for national deployment – now.  After some two decades of research, testing, and small-scale deployment programs, there is a clear consensus supporting V2X DSRC among government (federal and state), vehicle OEMs, device manufacturers, and researchers.

Key national standards for V2V DSRC, such as SAE J2735 and SAE J2945/1, determined through a consensus-based process, are in place. OmniAir is preparing to launch a certification program to provide critical conformance and interoperability certification. The Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot in Ann Arbor, Michigan proved the viability of V2V and V2I safety applications in real-world conditions. DSRC has answered key technical, policy, and institutional issues.

I am excited about the future vision of driverless cars and shared mobility. Like many of you, I will be attending the next month’s AUVSI/TRB Symposium on Automated Vehicles in San Francisco to better understand how this future is quickly becoming a reality.

However, as policymakers begin to set rules for vehicle automation, they would do well to make use of existing, market-ready safety technologies that will improve the safety of self-driving cars. Vehicle connectivity provides an essential additional safety layer for self-driving cars. Let’s start using it to save lives–now.

OmniAir Consortium is the leading industry association promoting interoperability and certification for connected vehicles, ITS, and transportation payment systems. To learn more about OmniAir, visit our website at www.omniair.org

Jason M. Conley
Executive Director, OmniAir Consortium

Opportunity for Authorizing OmniAir’s Initial V2X Test System

OmniAir is preparing to launch the first ever DSRC-based vehicle-to-everything (V2X) device certification program.  Before launch, Omniair will qualify the test systems and equipment that will be utilized by OmniAir-approved Test Laboratories (OATL) for device testing.  The work performed is designed to refine and finalize our test policies and procedures per 2016 standards and 2017 security certificates.

Following the official launch of OmnAir’s Connected Vehicle Device Certification Program, other test equipment providers and laboratories have an opportunity to participate. This demonstration project is for test equipment and test system providers with market-ready solutions.

Opportunity:

Test equipment system providers that are OmniAir members are encouraged to participate and submit their qualifications. The goal is to achieve test equipment systems validation for use in an authorized test laboratory for connected vehicle device conformance.

Submissions are due no later than 5 p.m. EDT, Wednesday, June 21, 2017.

The successful candidate(s) must demonstrate device testing with the test equipment capabilities and conformance based on 2016 standards with SCMS/CAMP quality certificates. OmniAir may consider Plugfest certificates as a substitute. Applicants must be ready to submit an application and have the test equipment audited at their facility (if not portable) starting July 5, 2017.

Selection criteria:

  • Must be an OmniAir member in good standing.
  • Bench DSRC test equipment system to validate OmniAir Release 1 test plan or specific functionality per 2016 standards and requirements; field test equipment is optional but highly desirable.
  • Comprehend IEEE and SAE DRSC standards per 2016 revision, USDOT device (OBU & RSU) requirements and SAE J2735 message decoding (BSM & WSA mandatory and others plus).
  • Provide data sheet and user manual of test equipment system.
  • Provide testing functionality coverage matrix regarding standards verifying and validation process used.
  • Demonstrated testing capabilities and provide test report samples for both OBE and RSE devices or specific functionality.
  • Auditable and maintaining capability of evolving DSRC technology.
  • Maintain OmniAir membership and requirements including plugfest participation and technical committees/activities.

Price:

Interested test tool providers are invited to submit technical proposals. All submissions shall be treated as confidential. The audit and certification fee is $10,000.00 for a system or $5,000.00 for a specific test tool; plus, travel costs.

Proposal Submission:

Email submissions to Jason Conley (jconley@omniair.org), and to Randy Roebuck (rdroebuck@omniair.org).

Questions:

OmniAir staff to host a conference call for interested test equipment providers at 11 a.m. EDT on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Questions must be submitted in writing no later than 5 p.m. EDT, Wednesday, June 14, 2017.

Written questions are encouraged before the call. OmniAir to share queries and responses with all participating laboratories on the call.

Interested parties can submit questions and receive the dial-in number by emailing Jason Conley. (jconley@omniair.org)

Opportunity for First OmniAir Authorized Test Laboratory for V2X

OmniAir is preparing to launch the first ever DSRC-based vehicle-to-everything (V2X) device certification program. Before launching, we will be authorizing one test laboratory as part of a certification demonstration project to help finalize our test lab authorization policy and procedures.

Following the official launch of OmnAir’s Connected Vehicle Device Certification Program, we will open up this opportunity to other test laboratories. This demonstration project is for test laboratories ready to test DSRC devices now

Opportunity:

Accredited test laboratories that are OmniAir members are encouraged to participate and submit a proposal to become the first authorized test laboratory for connected vehicle device certification.

Proposals are due no later than 5 p.m. EDT on Monday, June 19, 2017.

The successful candidate will demonstrate device testing, laboratory capabilities and conformance based on 2016 standards with SCMS/CAMP quality certificates. OmniAir may consider Plugfest certificates as a substitute. Applicants must be ready to submit to an initial audit at their facility the week of July 17, 2017.

Selection criteria:   

  • Must be an OmniAir member in good standing
  • Must be an accredited test laboratory
  • Price proposal (will be an important factor)
  • Qualified DSRC test equipment for both bench and field testing
  • Comprehend IEEE and SAE DRSC standards per 2016 standards and USDOT device (OBU & RSU) requirements
  • Demonstrated testing capabilities and provide test report samples for both OBE and RSE devices
  • Engineer (subject matter expert) and technicians qualified to conduct DSRC testing, generate test reports and interface with their clients
  • Auditable and maintaining capability with DSRC technology through OmniAir
  • Maintain OmniAir membership and requirements including plugfest participation and technical committees/activities
Proposals:

Interested laboratories are invited to submit price and technical proposals.
All bids shall be treated as confidential.

OmniAir will not consider any price proposal under $10,000.00.

Proposal Submission:

Email submissions to Jason Conley (jconley@omniair.org), and to Randy Roebuck (rdroebuck@omniair.org).

Questions:

OmniAir staff will host a conference call for interested test laboratories at 1 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. Questions must be submitted in writing no later than 5 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, June 13, 2017.

Written questions are encouraged before the call. OmniAir will share submitted questions and responses with all participating laboratories on the call.

Interested parties can submit questions and receive the dial-in number by emailing Jason Conley. (jconley@omniair.org)

How should the automotive industry test V2X systems?

OmniAir associate-level member, Spirent developed a white paper that addresses several hurdles that V2X stakeholders will need to overcome, and quickly if the promised advances in connected vehicle functionality are going to meet users’ expectations:
  1. Integrating heterogeneous systems
    Systems engineers will need to predict, account for and reconcile a rapidly increasing variety of factors – both inside and outside the vehicle itself – and enable the vehicle to process and prioritize the information correctly
  2. Sheer technical complexity
    Even by the high standards of the automotive industry, creating a working V2X system is a difficult technical challenge. Each V2X system will need to interface on many fronts – including several that are wireless or based on technologies which are new and, as yet, not fully proven.
  3. Satisfying stringent requirements
    Before a V2X system is deemed acceptable for the market; it will need to deliver consistently high standards across a range of requirements.
  4. Susceptibility to channel interference
    Any wireless communication channels that V2X system uses could be affected by signal interference and other impairments.
  5. Improving security against cyber attacks
    The risks to connected vehicles from deliberate hacking and spoofing are real, current, and growing.
  6. Meeting regulatory legislation and standardization
    To ensure safety and interoperability, authorities in the US and EU are taking an active interest in V2X, establishing standards, with regulatory legislation likely to follow.
  7. Rapidly changing market conditions
    Drivers have always demanded absolute reliability from automotive systems – with significant brand damage if a manufacturer acquires a poor reputation.

Thought-leaders Present and Attended OmniAir’s Automotive Cybersecurity Luncheon

On May 31, OmniAir Consortium hosted the first in a series of policy roundtables focused on automotive cybersecurity issues. This event, sponsored by CYMOTIVE Technologies, was hosted at the City Club of Washington, DC.

Officials from the U.S. Department of Transportation, including Cem Haitpoglu from NHTSA and Kevin Gay from the ITS Joint Program Office, briefed participants on current federal research efforts to address cybersecurity issues associated with Connected and Automated Vehicle technologies.

Booz Allen Hamilton’s Chris Poulin directed a focused conversation of key technical and policy issues that also included Integrity Security Services’ David Sequino emphasizing the need for industry-driven certification programs and voluntary guidelines.

The 2.5-hour panel discussion had significant audience participation. “No presentations, no audio-visual, no media, no distractions just a hollow-square seating configuration, filled with industry leaders who encouraged interaction and discussion said event panelist, David Sequino. “I was surprised at the level of participation, and free flowing discussions that took place and I look forward to participating in future panels.”

Leading security, technology, and automotive experts actively participated in the discussion. They included representatives from Consumer Technology Association, CompTIA, Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, GW Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, 3M, UL, MET Labs, CYMOTIVE, Monument Policy Group, Catalyst Partners, and the U.S.-Israel Transportation Innovation Center, among others.

“We hosted an intimate roundtable bringing together leading government officials and experts in automotive cybersecurity, said Jason Conley, Executive Director at OmniAir. “The conversation about ongoing government research and industry efforts to ensure the security of V2X and AV technologies was eye-opening. OmniAir intends to address the cybersecurity issue head-on, as we develop our certification programs.”

OmniAir plans on hosting several more roundtable discussions throughout the year. Our inaugural event was made possible through a paid sponsored by CYMOTIVE Technologies, a cybersecurity firm based in Israel. If you would like to sponsor an event, participate on the panel or have topics you would like covered; please contact Ryan Hall, OmniAir’s director of marketing and communications.

OmniAir Consortium is the leading industry association promoting interoperability and certification for connected vehicles, ITS, and transportation payment systems. To learn more about OmniAir, visit our website at www.omniair.org.

Cybersecurity Expert Chris Poulin Joins Automotive Cybersecurity Roundtable

Please join OmniAir for an intimate roundtable discussion on automotive cybersecurity with senior government officials, automotive and cybersecurity experts to discuss and analyze research and best practices moving forward. Cybersecuirty expert Chris Poulin will lead the discussion as the panel’s moderator.

Chris has over 30 years experience in the field of cybersecurity. He is the Principal Director overseeing the Connected Products Program at Booz Allen Hamilton. Chris’ expertise and attention are on the Internet-of-thing (IoT), with a focus on the connected vehicle.

Before joining Booz Allen, Chris spent five years at IBM managing the X-Force security research group, responsible for researching and analyzing security trends as they relate to cybercrime, cyberwarfare, corporate espionage, hacktivism, and emerging threats, with a particular focus on security for the IoT, especially connected vehicles. Chris authored IBM’s two automotive security POV white papers and forged the IoT security strategy across business lines.

“OmniAir is leading the charge on certification for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology. Securing the connected vehicle platform is pivotal to widespread acceptance and deployment of connected and autonomous vehicles said,” Jason Conley, executive director at OmniAir. “OmniAir is bringing together leading government officials and experts in automotive cybersecurity for a conversation about ongoing government research and industry efforts to address this issue.”

For additional information and to register for the event visit our event page.

OmniAir Consortium is the leading industry association promoting interoperability and certification in ITS, tolling, IoT technologies and connected vehicles. OmniAir’s membership includes public agencies, private companies, research institutions, and independent test labs. OmniAir is preparing to launch its Connected Vehicle Certification program later this summer, and to host a Plugfest in the San Francisco Bay Area in October. Learn more about OmniAir at www.omniair.org.

Southern California Agencies Issue Joint RFI for Advanced Transportation Technologies

On May 5, the Coalition for Transportation Technology, an alliance of local and regional governments in the Greater Los Angeles Region, released a Request for Interest (RFI) to survey to gauge the level of interest of private industry for advanced transportation technologies and opportunities. These include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), connected vehicles (CV), automated/autonomous vehicles (AV), vehicle-to-everything (V2X), and data analytics.

In a statement regarding the formation of the Coalition, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said, “Connected and self-driving cars promise to not only transform how we commute – but how we think about the safety and convenience of all automotive travel. This coalition will ensure that the demands and challenges of this new technology are fully considered as we invest in our infrastructure and plan for L.A.’s transportation future.”

“OmniAir members are encouraged to participate in the RFI to help shape the strategic action plan of the coalition,” said Jason Conley, Executive Director at OmniAir. “This is a great opportunity to help guide their near, mid and long-range objectives and get your name and products in front of some of the largest agencies in the country.”

Coalition members include the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT), County of Los Angeles Department of Public Works (LACDPW), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), and Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG).

If you are interested in submitting a response, the RFI is located here. Questions and comments can be submitted via email CoalitionForTransportationTech@gmail.com.

San Antonio Connected Vehicle PlugFest a Success

The recent U.S. Department of Transportation Connected Vehicle PlugFest was a resounding success. The May 8-12 event, hosted at the Southwest Research Institute’s campus in San Antonio, TX, focused on testing and certifying DSRC-based V2X devices.

Over 200 attendees, representing 70 organizations, from 17 countries participated in the week-long event, that focused on testing of DSRC devices. Device manufacturers participated in bench testing, interoperability testing, and field testing. View PlugFest images here!

Jeffrey Ballone of the Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center, kicked off the event with a vision for how Connected Vehicle technologies can dramatically reduce vehicle fatalities. Southwest Research Institute’s Mike Brown and Purser Sturgeon discussed the status of testing requirements and Dmitri Khijniak of 7Layers talked about DSRC device certification, including OmniAir’s planned certification program and Bill Lattin of Integrity Security Services discussed the commercial perspective regarding SCMS.

“Connected Vehicle technology is poised to hit the market,” said, Jason Conley, Executive Director at Omniair. “The strong participation in this Plugfest by automotive OEMs, tier 1 suppliers, device manufacturers, and software developers from around the world is a testament to readiness of DSRC-based V2X technology for deployment–now.”

OmniAir is preparing to launch its Connected Vehicle Certification program later this summer, and to host a Plugfest in the San Francisco Bay Area in October.

OmniAir members participating in the Plugfest: 

Future OmniAir members participating in the PlugFest: